Barbara Boller

Interview Barbara Boller
Excerpts from our interview with model Barbara Boller:

Hello Barbara, tell us about you. What should we know?

Well, I‘m a Life lover. I always describe myself like that because I thoroughly enjoy my life and everything that happens to me. I like to observe the little things, the small details that people are not really looking at, the simple things. I love people and their stories. I love to know everything about someone I’ve never seen before. I‘m a Pisces. so I believe it says a lot about me. I’m extremely sensitive, calm, sweet, and romantic and I am definitely a Nerd. Although I consider myself to be fairly humorous and crazy at the same time. I feel like nothing happens by chance. So when we get to know someone, we will definitely learn something from them, but we also teach them something new. I believe every relationship that crosses your life will help mould you as a person.

Is there a photographic genre you feel most comfortable with as model?

Absolutely. I love sensual concepts. I enjoy the feeling of feeling sexy. It‘s so funny because as a child and teenager I used to be extremely shy. I struggled to speak to people. I really feel comfortable because I can express myself better. When I speak of sexy I do not necessarily mean nude, you can be sexy wearing a winter jacket which says a lot about a model because your whole body is integrated in one feeling. You have the eyes, the cheeks, the mouth, your hands, your belly, legs all unites to express one specific feeling. And for this you have to love yourself, and feel yourself because you’re allowing people to see what‘s inside you. That‘s art, for me!

A good photographer …

… is someone who can see beneath your beautiful. someone who can understand you and connect with you at just a glance. When you are shooting you don’t always have time to be talking to each other so if both the photographer and the model are able to create this connection, it’s a wrap!!!

If you want to read the full interview, get your copy of FURORE Magazine here.

Peter „Piet“ Klassen

Interview Peter "Piet" Klassen
Excerpts from our interview with photographer Peter „Piet“ Klassen:

What inspires you? Which artists, models have moulded you and who would you like to meet?

One person that I know personally and who inspires me all the time is Martin Strauss. Besides him artists like Jenna Rütter, Wojtel Pruchnicke, Kessler Tran and others influenced me during the beginning stages of my career.

What is important for you when you choose your models?

Usually I already have a number of models, who suit or improve my portfolio in mind and with whom i am already in contact with. It is not just their look and beauty. I have to be able to imagine them in my kind of pictures as well, able to portray my concept.

How is the balance between shooting and postproduction?

As I mentioned earlier I give 100% while shooting and another 100% during postproduction. But honestly I think the postproduction takes more time as it requires more attention to detail and hard work but I thoroughly enjoy it so I don’t mind.

If you want to read the full interview, get your copy of FURORE Magazine here.

Hartmut Nörenberg

Interview Hartmut Nörenberg
Excerpts from our interview with photographer Hartmut Nörenberg:

Hello Hartmut, please give us some basic information about you and how your photo- graphy started?

My name is Hartmut Nörenberg. I’m a photographer and post-production artist based in the small village called Mülheim in Germany. It’s near Düsseldorf and Cologne. I started taking photos when I was quite young. But back then, as you can surely imagine, it was just for fun and not as serious as it is now. My father has also taken a keen interest in photography so he would always take me along with on trips and he’d show me many interesting things. I bought my first camera when I was 17 years old and back then I took lots of pictures of my current girlfriend. At first it was just a hobby but after one year I started shooting with some other friends and models. That was the time I became more ambitious in retouching and digital postproduction. I experimented with my own images before I got involved in different retouching projects which also included other pictures.

Erotic photography is …

… something that gives the audience the feeling to be part of the scenery and be live on set, it satisfies our voyeuristic needs with an artistic approach.

How important is the web and social media for you to market and promote yourself?
What do/did you do and what worked for you?

Social Media is important, but personal contacts and verbal, face-to-face communications are much more important. The biggest problem is that social media is hyping only stuff that is trending.

You need to spend a lot of time on connecting and networking, which in my opinion is too time consuming. Outsourcing social media is the most effective way to have time for new projects and take care of precious clients.

If you want to read the full interview, get your copy of FURORE Magazine here.

Jeremy Gibbs

Interview Jeremy Gibbs
Excerpts from our interview with photographer Jeremy Gibbs:

What is the philosophy about your photogra- phy? is there a general message or theme?

My philosophy is: ’Life is like photography, you use the negatives to develop‘. A friend once asked why my photographs were so ’dark‘ and up until then I had never thought of them as being dark in any way. But now I look at them and think maybe they are! I do have dark thoughts. But I think my photographs show hope. I hope that they are emotive and strong enough for one to look at and make up their own story. I photograph a moment in time, it should never be explained, it is up to the viewer to make up their own story.

What are you looking for when it comes to chosing models?

When I am shooting nudes I will be looking for a particular body shape that I feel will work best in the chosen location. For instance, in an industrial space a strong athletic body works well. I stay away from ’glamour‘ models, that look doesn‘t work in abandonment for me.

What do you like about your work and what would you like to improve?

When I first started shooting models in abandoned places 6 years ago there was maybe a handful of photographers working in this genre. These days it seems to be very popular but what makes mine stand out from the crowd I think is the models I use. A good model makes all the difference and I choose mine with great care.

What would I like to improve? Although I am known best for using only natural light and I do believe it returns the best results. But sometimes the low light in these locations ma-kes it impossible so I need to learn and start using strobes. Its next on my agenda. (smiles)

If you want to read the full interview, get your copy of FURORE Magazine here.

 

Ana Dias

Interview Ana Dias
Excerpts from our interview with photographer Ana Dias:

Do you see yourself as an artist and how do you get inspired?

I think of myself as passionate, expressive, bold, energetic, fresh and, hopefully, unique. I am an artist, of course! Regarding inspiration, I can get it from every single aspect of my life … From a travel, from a movie, from a song. There is no rule. But I feel that what inspires me the most and that makes me want to create is beauty itself, especially feminine beauty.

What is it like to shoot for PLAYBOY?
Is it a dreamjob and what is different to other shoots?

Working for Playboy is a dream job, of course! It allows me to work with the most amazing models in the world, to travel to breathtaking places, to meet new and interesting people and their cultures. Being a Playboy photographer I can do just that. And also, because I’m part of this big family, I got to meet my idol last year at the Playboy Mansion: Hugh Hefner!

At this time I have a webshow for Playboy UsA that is called “PLAYBOY ABROAD: Adventures with Photographer Ana Dias” and it is basically a diary of my life as a Play- boy photographer. In each episode I always have a different model, that is shot in a dif- ferent city, somewhere in the world. That was the best thing that ever happened to me! Each month I travel to a few different countries and it’s such a thrill! I find myself very lucky to be able to photograph and travel and make a living of it!

What are the pros and cons about being a female photographer in the erotic media business?

There are no cons! It’s quite useful, however, to be a women that photographs women because I understand the female body very well, and I know how to show it in the best possible way. Also, because I’m a heterosexual woman, there is no sexual tension in the shoot and so it’s easier to communicate with the models and reach the image that I envisioned in my mind.

If you want to read the full interview, get your copy of FURORE Magazine here.

Tomasz Zienkiewicz

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Excerpts from our interview with photographer Tomasz Zienkiewicz:

Hi Tomasz, tell us about you and how did you start photography?

Hi, first of all I would like to say that I do not consider myself as a photographer despite doing it as a profession and this is due to the fact that I did not study photography during tertiary education. Photography started as a passion for me. At the time I was still working as a manager for a company. I would take pictures during any spare time I had. I enjoyed my freedom to shoot what I liked, because there were no expectations, no pressure coming from clients; no deadlines etc..
The more shoots I had done the more drawn to photography I had become. After four years of training and experimenting I decided to to do this on a professional basis. So it took me about eight years to build my portfolio.
Today I earn my money from giving workshops, commercial and private shoots.

What do you like about your photography and what would you like to improve?

There is something beyond photography that I always liked. The psychology, the emotions and sensuality. It was always about that. You learn to listen to people, learn to understand their emotions and capture that in your photographs.
When you ask about improvement it‘s tricky to answer. I like to keep my photography believable and natural. Although I know that I could improve my retouching or my lighting setups, I refuse to do it.
First of all I am too lazy, but more important is that if I put more energy in improving my preparations, lighting and retouching, my pictures would look completly different. It would push them too much towards the world of perfection and I don‘t want that.

A good model …

… is someone who can act, who can feel and is able to cooperate.
Sometimes you get a great looking model, but there is nothing more. No emotions. It’s like shooting a doll who you cannot talk to. A good model cooperates, understands my intentions, creates a proper mood and helps making much more than just a picture of a beautiful woman.
Honestly I think that my best shoots have been those where I could freely cooperate with the model. We had a lot of fun; we understood each other and we were able to capture authentic emotions.

If you want to read the full interview, get your copy of FURORE Magazine here.

Massimo Vecchi

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Excerpts from our interview with photographer Massimo Vecchi:

Who is Massimo Vecchi? Give us some information about you.

“Hello!” for the past 30 years now i have been in love with light and photography. I am also a former architect, a producer, an entrepreneur, as well as a husband, part of a loving family. I am a teacher and a dreamer. I live in Sicily, more specifically in Catania, Italy. This is where I have my studio and my production main base.

What was the nicest/most amusing memory you have that ever happened during a shoot?

Well I have experienced so many memorable events. Right now one in particular comes to mind.
This actually took place during one of the shootings for „Venus“. We were in Scala dei Turchi here in Sicily, when a couple of tourists came close to me in the shoot and asked if they could stay to watch the production to which I replied in affirmation. After a while, the man which was well in his sixties told me: „Mister I want to share with you, that for the first time in my life watching a nude woman I could appreciate the intense beauty without thinking about it in a sexually driven way and I wanted to thank you for this new experience“. This made me extremely happy and hopeful about the concept I have executed.

Do you think it’s easier to work as photographer now compared to before?

Once again I feel fifty/fifty regarding this topic. I think it is neither better nor
worse but rather always challenging. It is however better in that there are more resources to use and information is now more widely spread. There is an increase in the amount of people who are interested in photography. It is also much easier to get in touch with people from all around the globe.
I would say it is worse because many people think it is an easy way of art therefore the „standard“ in some areas is considered to be lower. I would consider it challenging because it is crucial that we keep raising the standard and educating our viewers through our work. To be able to communicate good principles and taking care of the quality of our work.

If you want to read the full interview, get your copy of FURORE Magazine here.